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Wednesday, December 8, 2010

WikiLeaks And Authoritarianism

Wikileaks
Whether or not this is a serious "cyberwar" or, if it is, it rises to the sober gravitas of an actual armed conflict, the battle against corporate websites by 4Chan and other hackers, tentatively abetted (so far) by primarily social networking sites, clarifies the field quite a bit.

One need only to look at the blogosphere's reaction to the leaks and the subsequent "payback" DDoS attacks to identify non-self-aware authoritarians on the left. Who, given the nature of leftist psychology, will rapidly become self-aware in embarrassingly short order. In any case, we're all finding out who our real "friends" are, on either side of the question.

In the interests of partisan fairness, I will state the obvious fact that the authoritarians are wrong, wrong, wrong. And their wrongness is a toxic stink upon all of us. They must be enlightened... no, not enough time for that. They must be defeated.

Sober gravitas or no, this is a definitive and very easy to understand struggle.

(I hope WikiLeaks gets their hands on any communications regarding the shameless and desperate manhunt and capture of co-founder Julian Assange. It is of somewhat significant importance that he be rescued, or history-as-recorded-by-the-victors will teach schoolchildren that he was some sort of international Benedict Arnold, instead of the shiniest goddamned light to come along in these dark times in a long, long while.)


Related: Arthur Silber's excellent series of articles concerning the Wikileaks "debate" and its relationship with authority and obedience. Of course, go directly to his site for the latest updates.

Update: Matthew Ingram is an ass.

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